iLaw Advises CleanCo in Company Rebrand and £7 Million Fund-Raise

iLaw Advises CleanCo in Company Rebrand and £7 Million Fund-Raise | iLaw - Corporate law firm in London

City boutique law firm iLaw, which has a focus on businesses and entrepreneurs, advised CleanCo in its company rebrand and a £7 million fund-raise for investment.

 

Founded by former Made in Chelsea TV personality Spencer Matthews, iLaw advised on the rebrand of the low & no-alcohol spirits business from Clean Liquor to CleanCo. Along with the rebrand, the company has also released two signature “ready to drink” products – Clean Gin & Tonic and Clean Rum & Cola which are now available in health food retailer Holland & Barrett. CleanCo also plans to expand its low-alcohol products across a wide range of beers, wines and vodka.

 

Led by Justin Ellis, the iLaw team helped the low-alcohol brand to raise £7 million investment from private individuals and venture capital funds for a 20% share in the company, following on from the £2m investment that completed in early 2020. Ursula Burns, the first African American woman CEO of a Fortune 500 company, and Simba Sleep founder James Cox are part of the investment group in the private raise. CleanCo will be spending the fund in advertising, product development and team expansion in the coming year.

 

iLaw director Justin Ellis commented: “The diverse nature of the investors, from private equity firms to well-known industry figures, plus actors and TV personalities, meant that we had to juggle a range of different priorities. That’s one of the things that makes it so interesting working with a client like CleanCo, and we were delighted to help them close their second investment round so that they can continue to expand their product range and markets.”

 

Notes to Editors 

iLaw is an innovative City of London commercial law firm with a focus on clients in the technology, media and telecoms sectors, although it has many clients in other sectors too.

To find out more, please contact iLaw’s director Justin Ellis via email at Justin.ellis@ilaw.co.uk or 07701 032087.

iLaw grows team in corporate push

iLaw grows team in corporate push

City boutique iLaw, which has a focus on businesses and entrepreneurs, especially in the tech sector, announces two major hires into its corporate and commercial practice.

 

Tony Roberts joins as Head of Corporate and Rhea Malhotra will lead the firm’s push in the CBD (Cannabidiol) sector.

 

Tony Roberts spent fourteen years at Herbert Smith Freehills LLP, including a posting to its Moscow office, and was a partner at City firm Royds Withy King LLP before moving to iLaw. Tony acts for clients across a range of sectors, especially tech, media, retail and hospitality, and has particular expertise in cross-border M&A and joint ventures.

 

Rhea Malhotra joins from Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld LLP. Rhea will be advising clients on regulation and investment opportunities, concentrating on the swiftly growing market for CBD products.

 

iLaw director Justin Ellis commented:  “iLaw’s business continues to grow strongly, despite the turbulent conditions, and we have had a strategic focus on expanding the corporate and commercial side of our practice. Tony Roberts and Rhea Malhotra have acted on some stellar deals and their track record will be of great benefit as we build up our presence in the corporate space. Their arrivals also reflect the beginnings of a recovery that we’ve been seeing in the corporate transactional market.”

London’s iLaw shortlisted for prestigious legal award

Law Society Excellence Award 2020 shortlist

iLaw has been shortlisted for a prestigious Law Society Excellence Award, the highest accolade for law firms in England and Wales.

 

iLaw has been shortlisted in the Law Firm of the Year – Boutique Firm category.

 

Justin Ellis, one of the firm’s founders, commented: “Since our foundation 14 years ago, we’ve aimed to be a “go-to” boutique adviser in the tech and media sectors. Over the past couple of years we’ve been taking active steps to expand our expertise and our reach, for example by hiring a cryptocurrency specialist and our first in-house marketing and business development executive. This has enabled us to provide our top-quality services to a wider range of clients.”

 

Law Society of England and Wales president Simon Davis said: “Congratulations to all those who have been shortlisted. There are more than 9,000 firms and 190,000 solicitors in England and Wales, so to be shortlisted for a Law Society Excellence Award is to be recognised as being among the very best of the best.

 

“The justice system was already under immense pressure prior to Covid-19 and the situation has been exacerbated by the pandemic, making the incredible work that is being done by solicitors across the country day-in day-out to support their clients more vital than ever.”

Winners will be announced in a series of online ceremonies from 13-15 October.

iLaw welcomes arbitration expert, Jenny Lau, to the firm

iLaw welcomes arbitration expert, Jenny Lau, to the firm

iLaw is pleased to announce the addition of lawyer Jenny Lau to our firm.  Jenny is an experienced litigator and will now be leading the arbitration practice at iLaw. She was a Director at Fieldfisher before joining Wilsons where she became a Partner.

 

Jenny has a broad and varied commercial practice dealing with complex and often international disputes. Her experience includes advising high net-worth individuals on insolvency and professional negligence issues relating to the film finance schemes. She has acted for a corporate Claimant in a treaty arbitration against Ukraine, worked for one of the Lehman Brothers entities and advised a number of mining companies regarding interests in Asia and the Balkans.

 

She also worked on Keymed (Medical & Industrial Equipment) Limited v Hillman and Woodford, one of The Lawyer’s Top 20 Cases of 2018.

 

Jenny has various areas of specialism including:

  • Banking and finance
  • Corporate disputes
  • Commercial fraud
  • Insolvency and restructuring
  • Professional negligence

 

Jenny speaks fluent Cantonese; with which she will be able to assist international clients.

 

Notes to Editors 

iLaw is an innovative City of London commercial law firm with a focus on clients in the technology, media and telecoms sectors, although it has many clients in other sectors too.

To find out more, please contact iLaw’s director Mark Culbert via email at mark.culbert@ilaw.co.uk or 07894 873152.

The country must take a pragmatic approach to privacy law when it comes to coronavirus tracking apps, says data protection specialist

The country must take a pragmatic approach to privacy law when it comes to coronavirus tracking apps, says data protection specialist

A leading data protection solicitor at London legal firm iLaw believes that the exceptional circumstances surrounding the COVID-19 pandemic mean that the physical health and safety of the population should weigh heavily in the balance with the application of data protection rules in tracking the virus.

Since the launch of a dedicated COVID-19 tracking app was announced by the Government there has been an ongoing debate regarding data protection and privacy laws, and there have been a variety of objections that the app would infringe those laws.

Justin Ellis, a Director at iLaw and an expert in data protection, said it is clear that there are many bases on which an app could be found to meet the conditions necessary for it to comply with data protection law and he hopes that the authorities, developers and users alike will take a pragmatic approach.

“Now is not the time for delay. A tracking app could be key in helping the Government to ease the lockdown and monitor the spread of the virus ensuring people remain safe,” said Justin.

“Data protection and privacy lawyers, such as myself, sometimes get carried away with the detail of the law, but these are unprecedented times and we mustn’t allow the legislation to get in the way of the immediate needs of our society unless absolutely necessary.”

Justin explained that one of the main issues with a tracking app is that it will be required to process ‘special categories’ of personal data, in particular health information.

This could raise important questions regarding consent, but Justin believes there are at least two other grounds on which such information could be processed lawfully – where processing is necessary to protect individuals’ lives and where processing is necessary for reasons of substantial public interest.

Another significant issue that the app may face is its ability to track people’s location. Justin said that in reality, as long as the system incorporated safeguards to ensure the security of location information, then it should be compliant with current data protection laws. He also pointed out that many apps on people’s phones already process this kind of information with only the most basic of consents.

He said: “I think we are at a point now where these questions should be quickly addressed in the most practical ways. The rules exist so that in circumstances such as those we face at the moment, we can find a way for such apps to be that achieves the best outcome for the nation’s public health while we safeguard the security of people’s personal information.”

Looking at the approach to data protection and COVID-19 tracking software, Justin concluded: “Fundamentally, if the country wants to come out of lockdown, its people are going to have to exercise some degree of trust.

“Unless the app is made compulsory, everyone will have the choice of whether to use it or not. Hopefully, the majority of the population is sensible enough to realise that it’s for the general good and therefore consent to the processing of their data.

“To build trust it is important that the Government is clear on what data is being processed and how it will be used. This should override many of the concerns that people have.”